JPIIA 2019 Required Summer Reading Assignments

First and Second Grade:

Did you know that when kids read over the summer they are more likely to leap ahead when they return to school? This is often called the “summer leap,” and we’ve made it a priority to keep your child’s skills sharp by encouraging them to read all summer long.
This year, as well as encouraging your child to participate in the Louisville Free Public Library summer reading program, our classes are signed up to participate in the Scholastic Read-a-Palooza Summer Reading Challenge, a free online reading program that invites students to keep track of their reading minutes all summer long. The benefits are two-fold: not only will your child keep their reading skills strong and earn digital rewards; they will also earn book donations for children across the country who have limited or no access to books.

How Scholastic Read-a-Palooza Summer Reading Challenge works:
From May 6 to September 6, as students read, they log in to the Scholastic website and enter their reading minutes using a password they will receive. As students enter minutes, they gain access to fun videos, activities and more. Also, when children participating in the Summer Reading Challenge collectively reach “minute milestones” (25, 50, and then 100 million minutes), Scholastic will donate at least 200,000 books to kids in need nationwide. So the more we read, the more kids we help!
Any student, who logs at least 500 minutes of reading time this summer, will receive a certificate at the beginning of next school year.
You can learn more about the Summer Reading Challenge at scholastic.com/summer. You can also visit scholastic.com/readapalooza to learn more about the Summer Reading Give Back, and how Scholastic is working to expand book access for families nationwide.

Third-Fifth Grade: 

Select two of the books listed for your grade to read.
Complete the activity below for one of the books that you have read. For your second book, you will have a one-on-one conference with your teacher. You should be prepared to have a book discussion with your teacher.

Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade
Magic Tree House: Midnight
on the Moon by Mary Pope
Osborne
Wish by Barbara O’Connor A Long Walk to Water by
Linda Sue Park
Freckle Juice by Judy Blume Rules by Cynthia Lord Bridge to Terabithia by
Katherine Paterson
Clementine by Sara
Pennypacker
Fish in a Tree
by Lynda Mullaly Hunt
Hero: Hurricane Rescue
by Jennifer Li Shotz
I Survived the American
Revolution, 1776 by
Lauren Tarshis
The Lemonade War by Jacqueline Davies The Watsons Go to
Birmingham–1963
by
Christopher Paul Curtis

Character Traits Project:
○ As you read, take notes on the main character of your book. (If your book has more than one main character, choose one of them.)

■ Think about what you learn about the character through their words, actions, feelings. Give detailed examples that support your responses.

■ Some questions to think about as you take notes are:

● How do you get to know the character?

● What is their personality like?

● Does your character’s attitude change from the beginning to the end?

● What qualities do you and your character have in common?

● How does your character react to problems in the story?
○ When you return to school in August, be sure to bring your notes with you because you will be using your notes to complete a project in class.

Work is due on August 19th!
These reading assignments will count as a grade for Reading.

Middle School (6-8) Required Summer Reading

All All Assignments Due On or Before August 19

Grades 6 and 7:

Read the books listed under your grade below. Complete the two book report packets contained in the registration packet.
Sixth Grade:
The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
Abduction by Peg Kehret

Seventh Grade:
The Greatest: Muhammad Ali by Walter Dean Myers
Zach’s Lie by Roland Smith

Eighth Grade
Required Reading:
Across Five Aprils
Book of Choice and Assignment
Assignments were distributed at the end of the school year. Also, all information is contained on Ms. Miller’s Google Classroom that students use. Copies are in the school office as well.